WWD_WK5

Introduction

This week we will look at how to do Data Mining/Machine Learning using SQL functions. Yes you can do data mining/machine learning in a database.

Notes

Click here to download the Oracle Data Mining notes

L5-1-In-Database_Data_Mining

Video

Video of Notes

Lab Exercises

Lab 1 – In-Database Machine Learning

[The following tasks should take approx. 35-40mins to complete including some time to RTFM!]

Check out the book chapter from my Oracle Data Mining book

Task 1 – Loading the data set
Load the required data sets into your schema. You will need to download the following files and save them to your environment. Then load these into your Schema using SQL Developer.

Training Data Set = mining_data_build_v.sql

Create two tables that have the same structure as MINING_DATA_BUILD_V table. These following tables should contain No data.

MINING_DATA_TEST_V
MINING_DATA_APPLY_V

Example SQL to create these tables with no records

create table mining_data_test_v
as select * from mining_data_build_v
where rownum < 1;

Now load the data into each of these tables.

MINING_DATA_TEST_V = mining_data_test_v.sql
MINING_DATA_APPLY_V = mining_data_apply_v.sql

Task 2 – Creating the settings table
Create the Settings table for a Decision Tree model

-- Create the settings table
CREATE TABLE decision_tree_model_settings (
setting_name VARCHAR2(30),
setting_value VARCHAR2(30));
-- Populate the settings table
-- Specify DT. By default, Naive Bayes is used for classification.
-- Specify ADP. By default, ADP is not used.
BEGIN
   INSERT INTO decision_tree_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
   VALUES (dbms_data_mining.algo_name,dbms_data_mining.algo_decision_tree);

   INSERT INTO decision_tree_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value)
   VALUES (dbms_data_mining.prep_auto,dbms_data_mining.prep_auto_on);
   COMMIT;
END;

Task 3 – Creating a Decision Tree
Create the model for the decision tree, with AFFINITY_CARD as the target attribute/feature.

BEGIN
DBMS_DATA_MINING.CREATE_MODEL(
   model_name => 'Decision_Tree_Model2',
   mining_function => dbms_data_mining.classification,
   data_table_name => 'mining_data_build_v',
   case_id_column_name => 'cust_id',
   target_column_name => 'affinity_card',
   settings_table_name => 'decision_tree_model_settings');
END;

Task 4 – Exploring the meta-data for the models
Use the following commands to explore the meta-data about the Decision Tree model.

Can you explain what the purpose is for each of these commands.

-- describe the model settings tables
describe user_mining_model_settings
-- List all the ODM models created in your Oracle schema => what machine learning models you have created
SELECT model_name,
   mining_function,
   algorithm,
   build_duration,
   model_size
FROM user_MINING_MODELS;
-- List the algorithm settings used for your machine learning model
SELECT setting_name,
   setting_value,
   setting_type
FROM user_mining_model_settings;
-- WHERE model_name in 'DECISION_TREE_MODEL2';
-- List the attribute the machine learning model uses. It may use a subset of the attributes.
-- This allows you to see what attributes were selected
SELECT attribute_name,
   attribute_type,
   usage_type,
   target
from all_mining_model_attributes
where model_name = 'DECISION_TREE_MODEL2';

You have now explored the machine learning models in your Oracle schema.

NOTE: SQL is not a graphic language. You cannot visualise the decision tree like in other graphical based tools.
But if you explore more of the DB objects created behind the scenes, you might be able to work this out.
This is not necessary for these exercises.

Task 5 – Generating the Confusion Matrix
First we need to apply the model to the test data set

-- create a view that will contain the predicted outcomes => labeled data set
CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW demo_class_dt_test_results
AS
SELECT cust_id,
   prediction(DECISION_TREE_MODEL2 USING *) predicted_value,
   prediction_probability(DECISION_TREE_MODEL2 USING *) probability
FROM mining_data_test_v;
-- Select the data containing the applied/labeled/scored data set
-- This will be used as input to the calculation of the confusion matrix
SELECT *
FROM demo_class_dt_test_results;

Now we generate the confusion matrix.

NB: Make sure to have server output turned on in SQL Developer

DECLARE
   v_accuracy NUMBER;
BEGIN
DBMS_DATA_MINING.COMPUTE_CONFUSION_MATRIX (
   accuracy => v_accuracy,
   apply_result_table_name => 'demo_class_dt_test_results',
   target_table_name => 'mining_data_test_v',
   case_id_column_name => 'cust_id',
   target_column_name => 'affinity_card',
   confusion_matrix_table_name => 'demo_class_dt_confusion_matrix',
   score_column_name => 'PREDICTED_VALUE',
   score_criterion_column_name => 'PROBABILITY',
   cost_matrix_table_name => null,
   apply_result_schema_name => null,
   target_schema_name => null,
   cost_matrix_schema_name => null,
   score_criterion_type => 'PROBABILITY');
   DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('**** MODEL ACCURACY ****: ' || ROUND(v_accuracy,4));
END;

Then run

— select the results that are now stored in the table created during the Confusion Matrix function

SELECT *
FROM demo_class_dt_confusion_matrix;

Task 6 – Applying the model to new data – Bulk processing
Let us now apply the model to new data that has already been gathered in a table. With bulk processing we want to generate a labeled data set that contains the predicted value by the machine learning model.

BEGIN
   dbms_data_mining.apply(
   model_name => 'Decision_Tree_Model2',
   data_table_name => 'MINING_DATA_APPLY_V',
   case_id_column_name => 'CUST_ID',
   result_table_name => 'NEW_DATA_SCORED');
END;

Inspect the results in the NEW_DATA_SCORED table and write some queries to compare the results.

You will need to refresh the object tree on the left hand side of SQL Developer to get this new table appearing.

Task 7 – Applying the model to new data – Real-time processing
Use the PREDICTION and PREDICTION_PROBABILITY functions to label data in real-time mode.

SELECT cust_id, PREDICTION(Decision_Tree_Model2 using *)
FROM MINING_DATA_APPLY_V;
SELECT cust_id, PREDICTION(Decision_Tree_Model2 using *), PREDICTION_PROBABILITY(Decision_Tree_Model2 using *)
FROM MINING_DATA_APPLY_V
WHERE rownum <=5;
SELECT cust_id
FROM MINING_DATA_APPLY_V
WHERE PREDICTION(Decision_Tree_Model2 using *) = 1
AND rownum <=10;

Task 8 – Using the model for What-if analysis
Now try out doing some What-If analysis using the machine learning model.

select PREDICTION_PROBABILITY (Decision_Tree_Model2, 0
USING 46 as AGE,
3 as HOUSEHOLD_SIZE,
'Assoc-A' as EDUCATION,
'M' as CUST_GENDER,
'MARRIED' as CUST_MARITAL_STATUS,
'Crafts' as OCCUPATION) Pred_Prob
from dual;

Lab 2 – Adding Text Mining to Classification

[The following tasks should take approx. 20-40mins to complete including some time to RTFM!]

The following example works through an example of a data set containing Text Descriptions, and how text processing can be built into a Classification model using Oracle Data Mining.

When it comes to Classification problems, typically the data set will be contain your typical categorical and numerical variables/features. The Automatic Data Preparation (ADP) feature of OML where it automatically pre-processes and transforms these variable for input to the machine learning algorithm. This greatly reduces the boring work of the data scientist and increases their productivity.

But sometimes data sets come with text descriptions. These will contain production descriptions, free format text, and other descriptive data, for example product reviews. But how can this information be included as part of the input data set to the machine learning algorithms. Oracle allows this kind of input data, and a letting bit of setup is needed to tell Oracle how to process the data set. This uses the in-database feature of Oracle Text.

The following example walks through an example of the steps needed to pre-process and include the text processing as part of the machine learning algorithm.

The data set: The data used to illustrate this and to show the steps needed, is a data set from Kaggle webiste. This data set contains 130K Wine Reviews. This data set contain descriptive information of the wine with attributes about each wine including country, region, number of points, price, etc as well as a text description contain a review of the wine.

The following are 2 files containing the DDL (to create the table) and then Import the data set (using sql script with insert statements). These can be run in your schema (in order listed below).

  1. Create table WINEREVIEWS_130K_IMP
  2. Insert records into WINEREVIEWS_130K_IMP table

I’ll leave the Data Exploration to you to do and to discover some early insights.

The ML Question

I want to be able to predict if a wine is a good quality wine, based on the prices and different characteristics of the wine?

Data Preparation

To be able to answer this question the first thing needed is to define a target variable to identify good and bad wines. To do this create a new attribute/feature called POINTS_BIN and populate it based on the number of points a wine has. If it has >90 points it is a good wine, if <90 points it is a bad wine.

ALTER TABLE WineReviews130K_bin ADD POINTS_BIN VARCHAR2(15);

UPDATE WineReviews130K_bin
SET POINTS_BIN = 'GT_90_Points'
WHERE winereviews130k_bin.POINTS >= 90;

UPDATE WineReviews130K_bin
SET POINTS_BIN = 'LT_90_Points'
WHERE winereviews130k_bin.POINTS < 90;

alter table WineReviews130K_bin DROP COLUMN POINTS;

The DESCRIPTION column data type needs to be changed to CLOB. This is to allow the Text Mining feature to work correctly.

-- add a new column of data type CLOB
ALTER TABLE WineReviews130K_bin ADD (DESCRIPTION_NEW CLOB);

-- update new column with data from the DESCRIPTION attribute
UPDATE WineReviews130K_bin SET DESCRIPTION_NEW = DESCRIPTION;

-- drop the DESCRIPTION attribute from table
ALTER TABLE WineReviews130K_bin DROP COLUMN DESCRIPTION;

-- rename the new attribute to replace DESCRIPTION
ALTER TABLE WineReviews130K_bin RENAME COLUMN DESCRIPTION_NEW TO DESCRIPTION;

 

Text Mining Configuration

There are a number of things we need to define for the Text Mining to work, these include a Lexer, Stop Word list and preferences.

First define the Lexer to use. In this case we will use a basic one and basic settings

BEGIN 
   ctx_ddl.create_preference('mylex', 'BASIC_LEXER'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mylex', 'printjoins', '_-'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute ( 'mylex', 'index_themes', 'NO'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute ( 'mylex', 'index_text', 'YES'); 
END;

Next we can define a Stop Word List. Oracle Text comes with a predefined set of Stop Word lists for most of the common languages. You can add to one of those list or create your own. Depending on the domain you are working in it might be easier to create your own and it is very straight forward to do. For example:

DECLARE
   v_stoplist_name varchar2(100);
BEGIN
   v_stoplist_name := 'mystop';
   ctx_ddl.create_stoplist(v_stoplist_name, 'BASIC_STOPLIST'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'nonetheless');
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'Mr'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'Mrs'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'Ms'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'a'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'all'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'almost'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'also'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'although'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'an'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'and'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'any'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'are'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'as'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'at'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'be'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'because'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'been'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'both'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'but'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'by'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'can'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'could'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'd'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'did'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'do'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'does'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'either'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'for'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'from'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'had'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'has'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'have'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'having'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'he'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'her'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'here'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'hers'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'him'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'his'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'how'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'however'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'i'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'if'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'in'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'into'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'is'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'it'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'its'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'just'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'll'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'me'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'might'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'my'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'no'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'non'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'nor'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'not'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'of'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'on'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'one'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'only'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'onto'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'or'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'our'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'ours'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 's'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'shall'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'she'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'should'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'since'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'so'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'some'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'still'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'such'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 't'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'than'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'that'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'the'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'their'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'them'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'then'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'there'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'therefore'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'these'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'they'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'this'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'those'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'though'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'through'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'thus'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'to'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'too'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'until'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 've'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'very'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'was'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'we'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'were'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'what'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'when'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'where'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'whether'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'which'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'while'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'who'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'whose'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'why'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'will'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'with'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'would'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'yet'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'you'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'your'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'yours'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'drink');
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'flavors'); 
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, '2020');
   ctx_ddl.add_stopword(v_stoplist_name, 'now'); 
END;

Next define the preferences for processing the Text, for example what Stop Word list to use, if Fuzzy match is to be used and what language to use for this, number of tokens/words to process and if stemming is to be used.

BEGIN 
   ctx_ddl.create_preference('mywordlist', 'BASIC_WORDLIST');
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','FUZZY_MATCH','ENGLISH'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','FUZZY_SCORE','1'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','FUZZY_NUMRESULTS','5000'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','SUBSTRING_INDEX','TRUE'); 
   ctx_ddl.set_attribute('mywordlist','STEMMER','ENGLISH'); 
END;

And the final step is to piece it all together by defining a new Text policy

BEGIN
   ctx_ddl.create_policy('my_policy', NULL, NULL, 'mylex', 'mystop', 'mywordlist');
END;

Define Settings for OML Model

We will create two models. An Attribute Importance model and a Classification model. The following defines the model parameters for each of these.

CREATE TABLE att_import_model_settings (setting_name varchar2(30), setting_value varchar2(30)); 
INSERT INTO att_import_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value)  
VALUES (''ALGO_NAME'', ''ALGO_AI_MDL'');
INSERT INTO att_import_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value) 
VALUES (''PREP_AUTO'', ''ON'');
INSERT INTO att_import_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value) 
VALUES (''ODMS_TEXT_POLICY_NAME'', ''my_policy'');
INSERT INTO att_import_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value) 
VALUES (''ODMS_TEXT_MAX_FEATURES'', ''3000'')';
CREATE TABLE wine_model_settings (setting_name varchar2(30), setting_value varchar2(30)); 
INSERT INTO wine_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value)  
VALUES (''ALGO_NAME'', ''ALGO_RANDOM_FOREST'');
INSERT INTO wine_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value) 
VALUES (''PREP_AUTO'', ''ON'');
INSERT INTO wine_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value) 
VALUES (''ODMS_TEXT_POLICY_NAME'', ''my_policy'');
INSERT INTO wine_model_settings (setting_name, setting_value) 
VALUES (''ODMS_TEXT_MAX_FEATURES'', ''3000'')';

Create the Training and Test data sets.

CREATE TABLE wine_train_data
AS SELECT id, country, description, designation, points_bin, price, province, region_1, region_2, taster_name, variety, title
FROM winereviews130k_bin 
SAMPLE (60) SEED (1);
CREATE TABLE wine_test_data
AS SELECT id, country, description, designation, points_bin, price, province, region_1, region_2, taster_name, variety, title
FROM winereviews130k_bin 
WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM wine_train_data);

All the set up is done, we can move onto the creating the machine learning models.

Create the OML Model (Attribute Importance & Classification)

We are going to create two models. The first is an Attribute Important model. This will look at the data set and will determine what attributes contribute most towards determining the target variable. As we are incorporting Texting Mining we will see what words/tokens from the DESCRIPTION attribute also contribute towards the target variable.

BEGIN
   DBMS_DATA_MINING.CREATE_MODEL(
      model_name          => 'GOOD_WINE_AI',
      mining_function     => DBMS_DATA_MINING.ATTRIBUTE_IMPORTANCE,
      data_table_name     => 'winereviews130k_bin',
      case_id_column_name => 'ID',
      target_column_name  => 'POINTS_BIN',
      settings_table_name => 'att_import_mode_settings');
END;

We can query the system views for Oracle ML to find out what are the important variables.

SELECT * FROM dm$vagood_wine_ai 
ORDER BY attribute_rank;

Here is the listing of the top 15 most important attributes. We can see from the first 15 rows and looking under column ATTRIBUTE_SUBNAME, the words from the DESCRIPTION attribute that seem to be important and contribute towards determining the value in the target attribute.

At this point you might determine, based on domain knowledge, some of these words should be excluded as they are generic for the domain. In this case, go back to the Stop Word List and recreate it with any additional words. This can be repeated until you are happy with the list. In this example, WINE could be excluded by including it in the Stop Word List.

Run the following to create the Classification model. It is very similar to what we ran above with minor changes to the name of the model, the data mining function and the name of the settings table.

BEGIN
   DBMS_DATA_MINING.CREATE_MODEL(
      model_name          => 'GOOD_WINE_MODEL',
      mining_function     => DBMS_DATA_MINING.CLASSIFICATION,
      data_table_name     => 'winereviews130k_bin',
      case_id_column_name => 'ID',
      target_column_name  => 'POINTS_BIN',
      settings_table_name => 'wine_model_settings');
END;

Apply OML Model

The model can be applied in similar ways to any other ML model created using OML. For example the following displays the wine details along with the predicted points bin values (good or bad) and the probability score (<=1) of the prediction.

SELECT id, price, country, designation, province, variety, points_bin, 
       PREDICTION(good_wine_mode USING *) pred_points_bin,
       PREDICTION_PROBABILITY(good_wine_mode USING *) prob_points_bin
FROM wine_test_data;

 

 

 

Lab 3 – Work on your SQL assignment

Use whatever time you have available to work on your SQL assignment.

Additional Reading

Oracle Data Mining – Classification Book chapter

Oracle Data Mining User Guide (Oracle Documentation)

Oracle Data Mining Concepts (Oracle Documentation)

PL/SQL Data Mining Packages and Functions (Oracle Documentation)